”“

cuteosphere:

it always disappointed me that Monster Girls are an anime porn thing rather than something used to explore the way society and the media dehumanises women, but oh well

shout out to all my fellow monsters

dggus:

i talk a lot of shit for someone who can’t choose rude dialogue options in games because i’m scared of hurting a characters feelings

idle-handss:

People who notice everything but remain silent are to be feared.

Anonymous sent: it sounds so fucking arrogant when you call yourself pretty like that lmao

chubbycheekhamster:

unwinona:

kateordie:

divinedorothy:

But I am pretty look at me im so pretty it’s not arrogance when it’s literally just a fact im so pretty

image

SO PRETTY!!!!! ME!!! IM PRETTY!!! IM A PRETTY PRETTY GIRL!!!! 

I like this.

If a man tells you you’re pretty, it’s supposed to be this amazing gift you cherish forever.

If you tell a man you’re pretty, you’re a horrible, shallow, awful person and it isn’t true.

to be fair anon, she is really pretty so

starblaine:

Marvel’s Chris Crisis (Chrisis) do the ice bucket challenge * * *

charlietheunicorn711:

chiibinomonodamon:

mhd-hbd:

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.
It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.
Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.
Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.
We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.
People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

Japan is so densely packed with people, that if they had american attitudes a civil war would erupt.

I got lost in Tokyo and was able to rely on two guys on bikes to guide me back to my hotel.
In Harajuku, I complimented a lolita girl and asked her if there was a store nearby where I could buy clothes like that and she took me all the way down  the street to it!

Sit down, this is going to be a wild ride of fond memories.
When I went to Japan, two of the girls in our group lost cameras and another dropped a diamond necklace inherited from her grandmother while we were up in the mountains. We informed staff working at the places these items were lost. All 3 items were mailed to them 2 days later. To our hotel in Tokyo. One of the biggest and busiest cities in the world. Almost two hours away from where they were lost. In the mountains.
The first day we were in Japan, we were visiting a palace in Kyoto and a group of middle school children on a field trip happened to chat with us. They eagerly gifted us, complete strangers, with paper cranes welcoming us to Japan for the first time. I still have the group picture we took with them.
The escalators in Japan work kind of like car roads where faster traffic goes in a different lane than slower traffic. If you plan on just standing on the escalator the whole way up, you stay on the left. If you plan on walking up the escalator, you go to the right. We didn’t know this at first, so we embarrassingly blocked the right side of the elevator and while our tour guide explained to us after, not a single person called us out and was rude to us. They just patiently waited.
In Tokyo, I cannot tell you how many little old grandmas and grandpas would overhear us speaking and, without hesitation, begin conversing with us in English giving us directions and offering us assistance. And even if they did not speak English, people would come up to us and motion to take group pictures for us and would arrange us so the pictures looked great and would attempt to make conversation nonetheless in broken English and us in broken Japanese. I have a particular photo taken outside a restaurant we ate at in Kyoto taken by two taxi drivers who happened to be parked outside at the time.
Vendors in and around the Tsukiji Fish Market: “Tourists? Students from America? Only in high school? Free samples! Please enjoy Japan and come back soon!”
Tokyo Disneyland! One of my friend’s pen pals met with us to join us for the day. That was the first time I’d even heard of her and the only time I had conversed with her at that point. A few months later, back home in America, I receive a package from her with a framed photograph of the two of us at Tokyo Disneyland. The frame was pink because I had mentioned it was my favorite color. She still emails me to this day, “If you ever come back to Japan, please let me know! I will come visit you wherever you are, and if you visit me, I’ll show you around!”
Table manners! I’m sure you’ve heard it’s polite to make some slurping noises while eating in Japan, to show you’re eating with gusto and enjoying the food. Towards the end of our two week trip, we had a late shabu-shabu dinner and were so exhausted we completely forgot our Japanese table manners and were completely silent (which is a miracle for Americans at the dinner table ok, but that also means the food is damn good cuz everyone is more focused on the food than talking). The owner of the restaurant had apparently been listening in and was so embarrassed we didn’t like the food that he came to apologize. I have never seen, in person, someone bow that low before, he was bent nearly in half. Even though we reassured him we loved the food (there was none left), he still insisted on giving us a whole huge tub of green tea ice cream for free.
It was the rudest awakening ever coming back from Japan to Los Angeles, of all places, where people are yelling at you left and right… My only regret in visiting Japan was leaving Japan. The Japanese people are, as a whole, some of the kindest and most generous people you will ever encounter.

charlietheunicorn711:

chiibinomonodamon:

mhd-hbd:

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.

It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.

Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.

Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.

We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.

People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

Japan is so densely packed with people, that if they had american attitudes a civil war would erupt.

I got lost in Tokyo and was able to rely on two guys on bikes to guide me back to my hotel.

In Harajuku, I complimented a lolita girl and asked her if there was a store nearby where I could buy clothes like that and she took me all the way down  the street to it!

Sit down, this is going to be a wild ride of fond memories.

When I went to Japan, two of the girls in our group lost cameras and another dropped a diamond necklace inherited from her grandmother while we were up in the mountains. We informed staff working at the places these items were lost. All 3 items were mailed to them 2 days later. To our hotel in Tokyo. One of the biggest and busiest cities in the world. Almost two hours away from where they were lost. In the mountains.

The first day we were in Japan, we were visiting a palace in Kyoto and a group of middle school children on a field trip happened to chat with us. They eagerly gifted us, complete strangers, with paper cranes welcoming us to Japan for the first time. I still have the group picture we took with them.

The escalators in Japan work kind of like car roads where faster traffic goes in a different lane than slower traffic. If you plan on just standing on the escalator the whole way up, you stay on the left. If you plan on walking up the escalator, you go to the right. We didn’t know this at first, so we embarrassingly blocked the right side of the elevator and while our tour guide explained to us after, not a single person called us out and was rude to us. They just patiently waited.

In Tokyo, I cannot tell you how many little old grandmas and grandpas would overhear us speaking and, without hesitation, begin conversing with us in English giving us directions and offering us assistance. And even if they did not speak English, people would come up to us and motion to take group pictures for us and would arrange us so the pictures looked great and would attempt to make conversation nonetheless in broken English and us in broken Japanese. I have a particular photo taken outside a restaurant we ate at in Kyoto taken by two taxi drivers who happened to be parked outside at the time.

Vendors in and around the Tsukiji Fish Market: “Tourists? Students from America? Only in high school? Free samples! Please enjoy Japan and come back soon!”

Tokyo Disneyland! One of my friend’s pen pals met with us to join us for the day. That was the first time I’d even heard of her and the only time I had conversed with her at that point. A few months later, back home in America, I receive a package from her with a framed photograph of the two of us at Tokyo Disneyland. The frame was pink because I had mentioned it was my favorite color. She still emails me to this day, “If you ever come back to Japan, please let me know! I will come visit you wherever you are, and if you visit me, I’ll show you around!”

Table manners! I’m sure you’ve heard it’s polite to make some slurping noises while eating in Japan, to show you’re eating with gusto and enjoying the food. Towards the end of our two week trip, we had a late shabu-shabu dinner and were so exhausted we completely forgot our Japanese table manners and were completely silent (which is a miracle for Americans at the dinner table ok, but that also means the food is damn good cuz everyone is more focused on the food than talking). The owner of the restaurant had apparently been listening in and was so embarrassed we didn’t like the food that he came to apologize. I have never seen, in person, someone bow that low before, he was bent nearly in half. Even though we reassured him we loved the food (there was none left), he still insisted on giving us a whole huge tub of green tea ice cream for free.

It was the rudest awakening ever coming back from Japan to Los Angeles, of all places, where people are yelling at you left and right… My only regret in visiting Japan was leaving Japan. The Japanese people are, as a whole, some of the kindest and most generous people you will ever encounter.

(Source: sinnumero)

The point of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

the point of pouring a shit ton of ice water over yourself is because when one suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) one of the effects the disease has is a numbness throughout the body, as well as struggling to breathe, and both these are meant to temporarily happen when doused in freezing water. It’s to raise awareness of what ALS feels like and encourage donations towards research and cures.

(Source: aristoxxcracy)

Chris Evans Ice Bucket Challenge (x)

(Source: luvindowney)